Maternal hormones as a tool to adjust offspring phenotype in avian species

Groothuis TGG, Muller W, von Engelhardt N, Carere C, Eising C (2005)
Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews 29(2): 329-352.

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Groothuis TGG, Muller W, von Engelhardt N, Carere C, Eising C. Maternal hormones as a tool to adjust offspring phenotype in avian species. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews. 2005;29(2):329-352.
Groothuis, T. G. G., Muller, W., von Engelhardt, N., Carere, C., & Eising, C. (2005). Maternal hormones as a tool to adjust offspring phenotype in avian species. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 29(2), 329-352.
Groothuis, T. G. G., Muller, W., von Engelhardt, N., Carere, C., and Eising, C. (2005). Maternal hormones as a tool to adjust offspring phenotype in avian species. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews 29, 329-352.
Groothuis, T.G.G., et al., 2005. Maternal hormones as a tool to adjust offspring phenotype in avian species. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 29(2), p 329-352.
T.G.G. Groothuis, et al., “Maternal hormones as a tool to adjust offspring phenotype in avian species”, Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, vol. 29, 2005, pp. 329-352.
Groothuis, T.G.G., Muller, W., von Engelhardt, N., Carere, C., Eising, C.: Maternal hormones as a tool to adjust offspring phenotype in avian species. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews. 29, 329-352 (2005).
Groothuis, T.G.G., Muller, W., von Engelhardt, Nikolaus, Carere, C., and Eising, C. “Maternal hormones as a tool to adjust offspring phenotype in avian species”. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews 29.2 (2005): 329-352.
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