Male attractiveness is negatively genetically associated with investment in copulations

Engqvist L (2011)
Behavioral Ecology 22(2): 345-349.

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Journal Article | Published | English
Abstract
In species with high male mating effort, there is a trade-off between mating effort spent in a current mating and resources left for future matings. Males are therefore expected to allocate resources prudently across successive matings. Attractive males that will have a high mating success might therefore be forced to decrease mating investment in comparison to less attractive males. Furthermore, if there is genetic variation in attractiveness, one might expect to find a negative genetic correlation between attractiveness and mating investment. Here this genetic prediction is tested using the scorpionfly Panorpa cognata (Insecta: Mecoptera). In this species males offer costly salivary secretions as nuptial gifts to females. By producing large secretions males increase copulation duration and sperm transfer, thus gaining an advantage in sperm competition. I used a full-sib breeding design and found that both attractiveness and mating investment showed considerable heritability. Most importantly, there was a significant negative genetic correlation between attractiveness and mating investment: in families with attractive individuals, males produced smaller salivary secretions than in families with less attractive males. The results thus demonstrate an important evolutionary trade-off between mating success and sperm competition success.
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Engqvist L. Male attractiveness is negatively genetically associated with investment in copulations. Behavioral Ecology. 2011;22(2):345-349.
Engqvist, L. (2011). Male attractiveness is negatively genetically associated with investment in copulations. Behavioral Ecology, 22(2), 345-349.
Engqvist, L. (2011). Male attractiveness is negatively genetically associated with investment in copulations. Behavioral Ecology 22, 345-349.
Engqvist, L., 2011. Male attractiveness is negatively genetically associated with investment in copulations. Behavioral Ecology, 22(2), p 345-349.
L. Engqvist, “Male attractiveness is negatively genetically associated with investment in copulations”, Behavioral Ecology, vol. 22, 2011, pp. 345-349.
Engqvist, L.: Male attractiveness is negatively genetically associated with investment in copulations. Behavioral Ecology. 22, 345-349 (2011).
Engqvist, Leif. “Male attractiveness is negatively genetically associated with investment in copulations”. Behavioral Ecology 22.2 (2011): 345-349.
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