Crystal structure of human pFGE, the paralog of the C alpha-formylglycine-generating enzyme

Dickmanns A, Schmidt B, Rudolph MG, Mariappan M, Dierks T, Figura von K, Ficner R (2005)
JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 280(15): 15180-15187.

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Abstract
In eukaryotes, sulfate esters are degraded by sulfatases, which possess a unique C alpha-formylglycine residue in their active site. The defect in post-translational formation of the C alpha-formylglycine residue causes a severe lysosomal storage disorder in humans. Recently, FGE (formylglycine-generating enzyme) has been identified as the protein required for this specific modification. Using sequence comparisons, a protein homologous to FGE was found and denoted pFGE (paralog of FGE). pFGE binds a sulfatase-derived peptide bearing the FGE recognition motif, but it lacks formylglycine-generating activity. Both proteins belong to a large family of pro- and eukaryotic proteins containing the DUF323 domain, a formylglycine-generating enzyme domain of unknown three-dimensional structure. We have crystallized the glycosylated human pFGE and determined its crystal structure at a resolution of 1.86 angstrom. The structure reveals a novel fold, which we denote the FGE fold and which therefore serves as a paradigm for the DUF323 domain. It is characterized by an asymmetric partitioning of secondary structure elements and is stabilized by two calcium cations. A deep cleft on the surface of pFGE most likely represents the sulfatase polypeptide binding site. The asymmetric unit of the pFGE crystal contains a homodimer. The putative peptide binding site is buried between the monomers, indicating a biological significance of the dimer. The structure suggests the capability of pFGE to form a heterodimer with FGE.
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Dickmanns A, Schmidt B, Rudolph MG, et al. Crystal structure of human pFGE, the paralog of the C alpha-formylglycine-generating enzyme. JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY. 2005;280(15):15180-15187.
Dickmanns, A., Schmidt, B., Rudolph, M. G., Mariappan, M., Dierks, T., Figura von, K., & Ficner, R. (2005). Crystal structure of human pFGE, the paralog of the C alpha-formylglycine-generating enzyme. JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY, 280(15), 15180-15187. doi:10.1074/jbc.M414317200
Dickmanns, A., Schmidt, B., Rudolph, M. G., Mariappan, M., Dierks, T., Figura von, K., and Ficner, R. (2005). Crystal structure of human pFGE, the paralog of the C alpha-formylglycine-generating enzyme. JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 280, 15180-15187.
Dickmanns, A., et al., 2005. Crystal structure of human pFGE, the paralog of the C alpha-formylglycine-generating enzyme. JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY, 280(15), p 15180-15187.
A. Dickmanns, et al., “Crystal structure of human pFGE, the paralog of the C alpha-formylglycine-generating enzyme”, JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY, vol. 280, 2005, pp. 15180-15187.
Dickmanns, A., Schmidt, B., Rudolph, M.G., Mariappan, M., Dierks, T., Figura von, K., Ficner, R.: Crystal structure of human pFGE, the paralog of the C alpha-formylglycine-generating enzyme. JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY. 280, 15180-15187 (2005).
Dickmanns, A, Schmidt, B, Rudolph, MG, Mariappan, M, Dierks, Thomas, Figura von, K, and Ficner, R. “Crystal structure of human pFGE, the paralog of the C alpha-formylglycine-generating enzyme”. JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 280.15 (2005): 15180-15187.
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