Growth, differentiation, and biochemical signatures of rhesus monkey mesenchymal stem cells

Kim BS, Lee CCI, Christensen JE, Huser T, Chan JW, Tarantal AF (2008)
Stem Cells and Development 17(1): 185-198.

Journal Article | Published | English

No fulltext has been uploaded

Author
; ; ; ; ;
Abstract
The goal of this study was to compare the growth and differentiation potential of rhesus monkey mesenchymal stem cells (rhMSCs) from different age groups (fetal, newborn, infant, juvenile), and to use confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy to assess the intrinsic biomolecular profiles of individual rhMSCs. Results indicated that fetal cells had significantly shorter population doubling times during the log growth phase (23.3 +/- 1.3 h) and greater population doubling times (66.5 +/- 6.5) when compared to other age groups (newborn 51.9 +/- 2.3, infant 38.2 +/- 3.1, juvenile 40.7 +/- 4.1). Fetal rhMSCs also differentiated toward osteogenic and adipogenic lineages at a faster rate when compared to cells from older animals. The Raman spectral analysis showed greater DNA and lower protein concentration in fetal compared to juvenile rhMSCs, although the spectra from different age groups shared many similar features. Additionally, principal component analysis (PCA), which is used to discriminate between rhMSCs, supported prior findings that suggested that cultured rhMSCs consist of a heterogeneous cell population. Although the growth potential of rhMSCs from the younger age groups was confirmed, further studies will be necessary to fully explore the potential usefulness of Raman micro-spectroscopy to characterize stem and progenitor cells such as rhMSCs.
Publishing Year
ISSN
eISSN
PUB-ID

Cite this

Kim BS, Lee CCI, Christensen JE, Huser T, Chan JW, Tarantal AF. Growth, differentiation, and biochemical signatures of rhesus monkey mesenchymal stem cells. Stem Cells and Development. 2008;17(1):185-198.
Kim, B. S., Lee, C. C. I., Christensen, J. E., Huser, T., Chan, J. W., & Tarantal, A. F. (2008). Growth, differentiation, and biochemical signatures of rhesus monkey mesenchymal stem cells. Stem Cells and Development, 17(1), 185-198.
Kim, B. S., Lee, C. C. I., Christensen, J. E., Huser, T., Chan, J. W., and Tarantal, A. F. (2008). Growth, differentiation, and biochemical signatures of rhesus monkey mesenchymal stem cells. Stem Cells and Development 17, 185-198.
Kim, B.S., et al., 2008. Growth, differentiation, and biochemical signatures of rhesus monkey mesenchymal stem cells. Stem Cells and Development, 17(1), p 185-198.
B.S. Kim, et al., “Growth, differentiation, and biochemical signatures of rhesus monkey mesenchymal stem cells”, Stem Cells and Development, vol. 17, 2008, pp. 185-198.
Kim, B.S., Lee, C.C.I., Christensen, J.E., Huser, T., Chan, J.W., Tarantal, A.F.: Growth, differentiation, and biochemical signatures of rhesus monkey mesenchymal stem cells. Stem Cells and Development. 17, 185-198 (2008).
Kim, Brandon S., Lee, C. Chang I., Christensen, Jared E., Huser, Thomas, Chan, James W., and Tarantal, Alice F. “Growth, differentiation, and biochemical signatures of rhesus monkey mesenchymal stem cells”. Stem Cells and Development 17.1 (2008): 185-198.
This data publication is cited in the following publications:
This publication cites the following data publications:

12 Citations in Europe PMC

Data provided by Europe PubMed Central.

Vibrational spectroscopy in stem cell characterisation: is there a niche?
Sule-Suso J, Forsyth NR, Untereiner V, Sockalingum GD., Trends Biotechnol. 32(5), 2014
PMID: 24703620
The potential of human fetal mesenchymal stem cells for off-the-shelf bone tissue engineering application.
Zhang ZY, Teoh SH, Hui JH, Fisk NM, Choolani M, Chan JK., Biomaterials 33(9), 2012
PMID: 22217806
Immortalized mesenchymal stem cells: an alternative to primary mesenchymal stem cells in neuronal differentiation and neuroregeneration associated studies.
Gong M, Bi Y, Jiang W, Zhang Y, Chen L, Hou N, Liu Y, Wei X, Chen J, Li T., J. Biomed. Sci. 18(), 2011
PMID: 22118013
Noninvasive detection and imaging of molecular markers in live cardiomyocytes derived from human embryonic stem cells.
Pascut FC, Goh HT, Welch N, Buttery LD, Denning C, Notingher I., Biophys. J. 100(1), 2011
PMID: 21190678
Comparative characterization of mesenchymal stem cells from different age groups of cynomolgus monkeys.
Ren Z, Wang J, Zou C, Guan Y, Zhang YA., Sci China Life Sci 53(5), 2010
PMID: 20596939
Superior osteogenic capacity for bone tissue engineering of fetal compared with perinatal and adult mesenchymal stem cells.
Zhang ZY, Teoh SH, Chong MS, Schantz JT, Fisk NM, Choolani MA, Chan J., Stem Cells 27(1), 2009
PMID: 18832592

54 References

Data provided by Europe PubMed Central.

Aging of mesenchymal stem cells.
Sethe S, Scutt A, Stolzing A., Ageing Res. Rev. 5(1), 2006
PMID: 16310414
Colony size distributions as a measure of in vivo and in vitro aging.
Smith JR, Pereira-Smith OM, Schneider EL., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 75(3), 1978
PMID: 274723
Heterotopic of bone marrow. Analysis of precursor cells for osteogenic and hematopoietic tissues.
Friedenstein AJ, Petrakova KV, Kurolesova AI, Frolova GP., Transplantation 6(2), 1968
PMID: 5654088

Export

0 Marked Publications

Open Data PUB

Web of Science

View record in Web of Science®

Sources

PMID: 18211228
PubMed | Europe PMC

Search this title in

Google Scholar