Aging effects in interlimb practice and coding complex movement sequences

Panzer S, Grützmacher N, Fries U, Krueger M, Shea CH (2011)
Human Movement Science 30(3): 459-474.

Download
Es wurde kein Volltext hochgeladen. Nur Publikationsnachweis!
Zeitschriftenaufsatz | Veröffentlicht | Englisch
Autor
; ; ; ;
Abstract / Bemerkung
Hikosaka et al. (1999) proposed that sequential movements are acquired in independent visual-spatial and motor coordinate systems with coding initially represented in visual-spatial coordinates, and later after extended practice in motor coordinates. One aspect of sequence learning that has not been systematically studied, however, is the question of whether or not older adults show the same pattern of coding in inter-limb practice as younger learners. In the present experiment an inter-limb practice paradigm was designed to determine the role that visual-spatial (Cartesian) and motor (joint angles, activation patterns) coordinates play in the coding and learning of a complex movement sequence. Younger and older adults practiced a 16-element movement sequence with one limb on Day 1 and the contra-lateral limb on Day 2. Practice involved the same sequence with either the same visual-spatial or motor coordinates on the two days. Retention tests were conducted on Day 3. Results indicated that keeping the visual-spatial coordinates the same during acquisition resulted in superior retention only for younger adults. Results also indicated the overall slowing of sequential movement production for older adults which appears to result from these participants inability to impose a structure on the sequence. This provides strong evidence that the visual-spatial code plays a dominant role in complex movement sequences and this code is represented in an effector-independent manner for younger adults, but not for older adults. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Erscheinungsjahr
Zeitschriftentitel
Human Movement Science
Band
30
Zeitschriftennummer
3
Seite
459-474
ISSN
PUB-ID

Zitieren

Panzer S, Grützmacher N, Fries U, Krueger M, Shea CH. Aging effects in interlimb practice and coding complex movement sequences. Human Movement Science. 2011;30(3):459-474.
Panzer, S., Grützmacher, N., Fries, U., Krueger, M., & Shea, C. H. (2011). Aging effects in interlimb practice and coding complex movement sequences. Human Movement Science, 30(3), 459-474. doi:10.1016/j.humov.2010.11.003
Panzer, S., Grützmacher, N., Fries, U., Krueger, M., and Shea, C. H. (2011). Aging effects in interlimb practice and coding complex movement sequences. Human Movement Science 30, 459-474.
Panzer, S., et al., 2011. Aging effects in interlimb practice and coding complex movement sequences. Human Movement Science, 30(3), p 459-474.
S. Panzer, et al., “Aging effects in interlimb practice and coding complex movement sequences”, Human Movement Science, vol. 30, 2011, pp. 459-474.
Panzer, S., Grützmacher, N., Fries, U., Krueger, M., Shea, C.H.: Aging effects in interlimb practice and coding complex movement sequences. Human Movement Science. 30, 459-474 (2011).
Panzer, Stefan, Grützmacher, Nicole, Fries, Udo, Krueger, Melanie, and Shea, Charles H. “Aging effects in interlimb practice and coding complex movement sequences”. Human Movement Science 30.3 (2011): 459-474.

13 Zitationen in Europe PMC

Daten bereitgestellt von Europe PubMed Central.

Influence of Cognitive Functioning on Age-Related Performance Declines in Visuospatial Sequence Learning.
Krüger M, Hinder MR, Puri R, Summers JJ., Front Psychol 8(), 2017
PMID: 28626442
Differences in chunking behavior between young and older adults diminish with extended practice.
Barnhoorn JS, Van Asseldonk EHF, Verwey WB., Psychol Res (), 2017
PMID: 29270674
Similar Representations of Sequence Knowledge in Young and Older Adults: A Study of Effector Independent Transfer.
Barnhoorn JS, Döhring FR, Van Asseldonk EH, Verwey WB., Front Psychol 7(), 2016
PMID: 27602001
Greater intermanual transfer in the elderly suggests age-related bilateral motor cortex activation is compensatory.
Graziadio S, Nazarpour K, Gretenkord S, Jackson A, Eyre JA., J Mot Behav 47(1), 2015
PMID: 25575222
A cognitive framework for explaining serial processing and sequence execution strategies.
Verwey WB, Shea CH, Wright DL., Psychon Bull Rev 22(1), 2015
PMID: 25421407
The 50s cliff: a decline in perceptuo-motor learning, not a deficit in visual motion perception.
Ren J, Huang S, Zhang J, Zhu Q, Wilson AD, Snapp-Childs W, Bingham GP., PLoS One 10(4), 2015
PMID: 25874880
Processing of visual information compromises the ability of older adults to control novel fine motor tasks.
Baweja HS, Kwon M, Onushko T, Wright DL, Corcos DM, Christou EA., Exp Brain Res 233(12), 2015
PMID: 26298044
Interlimb practice and aging: coding a simple movement sequence.
Panzer S, Gruetzmacher N, Ellenbürger T, Shea CH., Exp Aging Res 40(1), 2014
PMID: 24467702
Altered activation of the antagonist muscle during practice compromises motor learning in older adults.
Chen YT, Kwon M, Fox EJ, Christou EA., J Neurophysiol 112(4), 2014
PMID: 24848478
Reducing task difficulty during practice improves motor learning in older adults.
Onushko T, Kim C, Christou EA., Exp Gerontol 57(), 2014
PMID: 24909352
Perceptuo-motor learning rate declines by half from 20s to 70/80s.
Coats RO, Snapp-Childs W, Wilson AD, Bingham GP., Exp Brain Res 225(1), 2013
PMID: 23212470
Control of automated behavior: insights from the discrete sequence production task.
Abrahamse EL, Ruitenberg MF, de Kleine E, Verwey WB., Front Hum Neurosci 7(), 2013
PMID: 23515430
The coding and inter-manual transfer of movement sequences.
Shea CH, Kovacs AJ, Panzer S., Front Psychol 2(), 2011
PMID: 21716583

62 References

Daten bereitgestellt von Europe PubMed Central.

Sensorimotor adaptation in young and elderly humans
Bock, Neuroscience Biobehavior Review 26(), 2002
The effects of sequence difficulty and practice on proportional and nonproportional transfer
Braden, The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology 61(), 2008
Single limb performance following contralateral bimanual limb training.
Burgess JK, Bareither R, Patton JL., IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng 15(3), 2007
PMID: 17894267
Aging and motor control
Chaput, The Journal of Gerontology. Series B, Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences 51(), 1996
Transfer of movement sequences: bigger is better.
Dean NJ, Kovacs AJ, Shea CH., Acta Psychol (Amst) 127(2), 2007
PMID: 17723220
Implicit sequence learning without motor sequencing in young and old adults.
Dennis NA, Howard JH Jr, Howard DV., Exp Brain Res 175(1), 2006
PMID: 16788812
Parallel neural networks for learning sequential procedures.
Hikosaka O, Nakahara H, Rand MK, Sakai K, Lu X, Nakamura K, Miyachi S, Doya K., Trends Neurosci. 22(10), 1999
PMID: 10481194
Age differences in learning serial patterns: Direct versus indirect measures
Howard, Psychological Aging 4(), 1989
Adult age in the rate of learning serial patterns: Evidence from direct and indirect tests
Howard, Psychological Aging 7(), 1992
Implicit learning of predictive relationships in three-element visual sequences by young and old adults.
Howard JH, Howard DV, Dennis NA, Kelly AJ., J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn 34(5), 2008
PMID: 18763897
Implicit sequence learning: effects of level of structure, adult age, and extended practice.
Howard DV, Howard JH Jr, Japikse K, DiYanni C, Thompson A, Somberg R., Psychol Aging 19(1), 2004
PMID: 15065933
Learning of a serial task by different age groups
Kay, Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology 3(), 1951
The cognitive and neural architecture of sequence representation.
Keele SW, Ivry R, Mayr U, Hazeltine E, Heuer H., Psychol Rev 110(2), 2003
PMID: 12747526
On the modularity of sequence representation
Keele, Journal of Motor Behavior 27(), 1995
Age-related kinematic differences as influenced by task difficulty, target-size, and movement amplitude
Ketcham, Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences 57B(), 2002
Representation of movement sequences is related to task characteristics.
Kovacs AJ, Han DW, Shea CH., Acta Psychol (Amst) 132(1), 2009
PMID: 19631919
The coding and effector transfer of movement sequences
Kovacs, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance 35(), 2009
Independent learning of internal models for kinematic and dynamic control of reaching.
Krakauer JW, Ghilardi MF, Ghez C., Nat. Neurosci. 2(11), 1999
PMID: 10526344
The transfer of movement sequences: Effects of decreased and increased load
Muehlbauer, The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology 60(), 2007
The assessment and analysis of handedness: the Edinburgh inventory.
Oldfield RC., Neuropsychologia 9(1), 1971
PMID: 5146491
Asymmetric effector transfer of complex movement sequences.
Panzer S, Krueger M, Muehlbauer T, Shea CH., Hum Mov Sci 29(1), 2009
PMID: 19896230
Inter-manual transfer and practice: coding of simple motor sequences.
Panzer S, Krueger M, Muehlbauer T, Kovacs AJ, Shea CH., Acta Psychol (Amst) 131(2), 2009
PMID: 19389659
Inter-limb practice on coding and learning of movement sequences
Panzer, The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology 62(), 2009
Effector independence.
Park JH, Shea CH., J Mot Behav 34(3), 2002
PMID: 19260176
Effect of practice on effector independence.
Park JH, Shea CH., J Mot Behav 35(1), 2003
PMID: 12724097
Sequence learning: Response structure and effector transfer
Park, Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology: Section A – Human Experimental Psychology 58A(), 2005
The locus of age-related movement slowing: Sensory processing in continuous goal-directed aiming
Pohl, Journal of Gerontology Science B: Psychological Sciences & Social Sciences 51(), 1996
Structural factors in patterned finger tapping.
Povel DJ, Collard R., Acta Psychol (Amst) 52(1-2), 1982
PMID: 7164844
The role of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during sequence learning is specific for spatial information.
Robertson EM, Tormos JM, Maeda F, Pascual-Leone A., Cereb. Cortex 11(7), 2001
PMID: 11415965
On choosing between movement sequences: Comments on Rose (1988)
Rosenbaum, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance 16(), 1990
The processing-speed theory of adult age differences in cognition
Salthouse, Psychological Research 103(), 1996
Aging and time-sharing aspects of executive control.
Salthouse TA, Miles JD., Mem Cognit 30(4), 2002
PMID: 12184558
Age-related effects in sequential motor learning.
Shea CH, Park JH, Braden HW., Phys Ther 86(4), 2006
PMID: 16579665
Contextual dependencies: influence on response latency.
Shea CH, Wright DL., Memory 3(1), 1995
PMID: 8556536
Schema theory: a critical appraisal and reevaluation.
Shea CH, Wulf G., J Mot Behav 37(2), 2005
PMID: 15730943
Evidence for parallel explicit and implicit sequence learning systems in older adults
Song, Experimental Brain Research 196(), 2009

AUTHOR UNKNOWN, 0
Evidence for the development of concurrent processing in a sequential key pressing task
Verwey, Acta Psychologica 85(), 1994
Evidence for a multistage model of practice in a sequential movement task
Verwey, Journal of Experimental Psychology-Human Perception and Performance 25(), 1999
Diminished motor skill development in elderly: Indications for limited motor chunk use
Verwey, Acta Psychologica 134(), 2010
Effector dependent sequence learning in the serial RT task.
Verwey WB, Clegg BA., Psychol Res 69(4), 2004
PMID: 15235913
Motor-skill learning in older adults – a review of studies on age-related differences
Voelcker-Rehage, European Review on Aging and Physical Activity 5(), 2008
Effect of motor practice on dual-task performance in older adults
Voelcker-Rehage, Journal of Gerontology Science B: Psychological Sciences & Social Sciences 62(), 2007
Proportional and non-proportional transfer of movement sequences
Wilde, The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology 59(), 2006
A neuropsychological theory of motor skill learning.
Willingham DB., Psychol Rev 105(3), 1998
PMID: 9697430
Hearing loss in older adulthood. What it is and how it interacts with cognitive performance
Wingfield, Current Directions in Psychological Science 14(), 2005

Export

Markieren/ Markierung löschen
Markierte Publikationen

Open Data PUB

Web of Science

Dieser Datensatz im Web of Science®

Quellen

PMID: 21349597
PubMed | Europe PMC

Suchen in

Google Scholar