Brain mechanisms underlying human communication

Noordzij ML, Newman-Norlund SE, de Ruiter J, Hagoort P, Levinson CS, Toni I (2009)
Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3: 14.

Download
No fulltext has been uploaded. References only!
Journal Article | Original Article | Published | English

No fulltext has been uploaded

Author
; ; ; ; ;
Abstract
Human communication has been described as involving the coding-decoding of a conventional symbol system, which could be supported by parts of the human motor system (i.e. the "mirror neurons system"). However, this view does not explain how these conventions could develop in the first place. Here we target the neglected but crucial issue of how people organize their non-verbal behavior to communicate a given intention without pre-established conventions. We have measured behavioral and brain responses in pairs of subjects during communicative exchanges occurring in a real, interactive, on-line social context. In two fMRI studies, we found robust evidence that planning new communicative actions (by a sender) and recognizing the communicative intention of the same actions (by a receiver) relied on spatially overlapping portions of their brains (the right posterior superior temporal sulcus). The response of this region was lateralized to the right hemisphere, modulated by the ambiguity in meaning of the communicative acts, but not by their sensorimotor complexity. These results indicate that the sender of a communicative signal uses his own intention recognition system to make a prediction of the intention recognition performed by the receiver. This finding supports the notion that our communicative abilities are distinct from both sensorimotor processes and language abilities.
Publishing Year
ISSN
eISSN
PUB-ID

Cite this

Noordzij ML, Newman-Norlund SE, de Ruiter J, Hagoort P, Levinson CS, Toni I. Brain mechanisms underlying human communication. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. 2009;3:14.
Noordzij, M. L., Newman-Norlund, S. E., de Ruiter, J., Hagoort, P., Levinson, C. S., & Toni, I. (2009). Brain mechanisms underlying human communication. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 3, 14. doi:10.3389/neuro.09.014.2009
Noordzij, M. L., Newman-Norlund, S. E., de Ruiter, J., Hagoort, P., Levinson, C. S., and Toni, I. (2009). Brain mechanisms underlying human communication. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3, 14.
Noordzij, M.L., et al., 2009. Brain mechanisms underlying human communication. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 3, p 14.
M.L. Noordzij, et al., “Brain mechanisms underlying human communication”, Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, vol. 3, 2009, pp. 14.
Noordzij, M.L., Newman-Norlund, S.E., de Ruiter, J., Hagoort, P., Levinson, C.S., Toni, I.: Brain mechanisms underlying human communication. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. 3, 14 (2009).
Noordzij, Matthijs L., Newman-Norlund, Sarah E., de Ruiter, Jan, Hagoort, Peter, Levinson, C. Stephen, and Toni, Ivan. “Brain mechanisms underlying human communication”. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3 (2009): 14.
This data publication is cited in the following publications:
This publication cites the following data publications:

34 Citations in Europe PMC

Data provided by Europe PubMed Central.

Brains in dialogue: decoding neural preparation of speaking to a conversational partner.
Kuhlen AK, Bogler C, Brennan SE, Haynes JD., Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci 12(6), 2017
PMID: 28338791
You cannot speak and listen at the same time: a probabilistic model of turn-taking.
Donnarumma F, Dindo H, Iodice P, Pezzulo G., Biol Cybern 111(2), 2017
PMID: 28265753
Perceived communicative intent in gesture and language modulates the superior temporal sulcus.
Redcay E, Velnoskey KR, Rowe ML., Hum Brain Mapp 37(10), 2016
PMID: 27238550
You may now kiss the bride: Interpretation of social situations by individuals with right or left hemisphere injury.
Baldo JV, Kacinik NA, Moncrief A, Beghin F, Dronkers NF., Neuropsychologia 80(), 2016
PMID: 26546561
Communicative Signals Promote Object Recognition Memory and Modulate the Right Posterior STS.
Redcay E, Ludlum RS, Velnoskey KR, Kanwal S., J Cogn Neurosci 28(1), 2016
PMID: 26351992
How relevant is social interaction in second language learning?
Verga L, Kotz SA., Front Hum Neurosci 7(), 2013
PMID: 24027521
Neuroanatomy of financial decisions.
Bermejo PE, Dorado R, Zea-Sevilla MA, Sanchez Menendez V., Neurologia 26(3), 2011
PMID: 21163202

61 References

Data provided by Europe PubMed Central.

Relevance: Communication and Cognition
Sperber D., Wilson D.., 2001
The emergence of social cognition in three young chimpanzees.
Tomasello M, Carpenter M., Monogr Soc Res Child Dev 70(1), 2005
PMID: 16156847
Understanding and sharing intentions: the origins of cultural cognition.
Tomasello M, Carpenter M, Call J, Behne T, Moll H., Behav Brain Sci 28(5), 2005
PMID: 16262930
Signal-, set- and movement-related activity in the human brain: an event-related fMRI study.
Toni I, Schluter ND, Josephs O, Friston K, Passingham RE., Cereb. Cortex 9(1), 1999
PMID: 10022494
Multiple movement representations in the human brain: an event-related fMRI study.
Toni I, Shah NJ, Fink GR, Thoenissen D, Passingham RE, Zilles K., J Cogn Neurosci 14(5), 2002
PMID: 12167261
Automated anatomical labeling of activations in SPM using a macroscopic anatomical parcellation of the MNI MRI single-subject brain.
Tzourio-Mazoyer N, Landeau B, Papathanassiou D, Crivello F, Etard O, Delcroix N, Mazoyer B, Joliot M., Neuroimage 15(1), 2002
PMID: 11771995
Perceptuo-motor interactions during prehension movements.
Verhagen L, Dijkerman HC, Grol MJ, Toni I., J. Neurosci. 28(18), 2008
PMID: 18448649
A unifying computational framework for motor control and social interaction.
Wolpert DM, Doya K, Kawato M., Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond., B, Biol. Sci. 358(1431), 2003
PMID: 12689384
Human brain activity time-locked to perceptual event boundaries.
Zacks JM, Braver TS, Sheridan MA, Donaldson DI, Snyder AZ, Ollinger JM, Buckner RL, Raichle ME., Nat. Neurosci. 4(6), 2001
PMID: 11369948
Autism, the superior temporal sulcus and social perception.
Zilbovicius M, Meresse I, Chabane N, Brunelle F, Samson Y, Boddaert N., Trends Neurosci. 29(7), 2006
PMID: 16806505

Export

0 Marked Publications

Open Data PUB

Web of Science

View record in Web of Science®

Sources

PMID: 19668699
PubMed | Europe PMC

Search this title in

Google Scholar