Reducing prejudice via cognitive dissonance: Individual differences in preference for consistency moderate the effects of counter-attitudinal advocacy

Heitland K, Bohner G (2010)
Social Influence 5(3): 164-181.

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Zeitschriftenaufsatz | Veröffentlicht | Englisch
Abstract / Bemerkung
Individual differences in preference for consistency (PFC) and their interplay with situational variables were studied in relation to effects of counter-attitudinal advocacy on prejudice. German adults (N = 202) who initially had relatively high prejudice toward Turks generated counter-attitudinal arguments favoring integrated housing of Turks and Germans. Freedom of choice (low, high) and self-threat (low, high) were manipulated; PFC (low, high) was measured and used as a third independent variable. Control participants generated arguments on a neutral topic. Dependent variables were discomfort at integrated housing and generalized prejudice toward Turks. Results showed that PFC moderated effects of choice and self-threat: Discomfort and prejudice were lowest for high-PFC participants who had generated counter-attitudinal arguments under high choice and high self-threat.
Erscheinungsjahr
Zeitschriftentitel
Social Influence
Band
5
Zeitschriftennummer
3
Seite
164-181
ISSN
eISSN
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Heitland K, Bohner G. Reducing prejudice via cognitive dissonance: Individual differences in preference for consistency moderate the effects of counter-attitudinal advocacy. Social Influence. 2010;5(3):164-181.
Heitland, K., & Bohner, G. (2010). Reducing prejudice via cognitive dissonance: Individual differences in preference for consistency moderate the effects of counter-attitudinal advocacy. Social Influence, 5(3), 164-181. doi:10.1080/15534510903332261
Heitland, K., and Bohner, G. (2010). Reducing prejudice via cognitive dissonance: Individual differences in preference for consistency moderate the effects of counter-attitudinal advocacy. Social Influence 5, 164-181.
Heitland, K., & Bohner, G., 2010. Reducing prejudice via cognitive dissonance: Individual differences in preference for consistency moderate the effects of counter-attitudinal advocacy. Social Influence, 5(3), p 164-181.
K. Heitland and G. Bohner, “Reducing prejudice via cognitive dissonance: Individual differences in preference for consistency moderate the effects of counter-attitudinal advocacy”, Social Influence, vol. 5, 2010, pp. 164-181.
Heitland, K., Bohner, G.: Reducing prejudice via cognitive dissonance: Individual differences in preference for consistency moderate the effects of counter-attitudinal advocacy. Social Influence. 5, 164-181 (2010).
Heitland, Kirsten, and Bohner, Gerd. “Reducing prejudice via cognitive dissonance: Individual differences in preference for consistency moderate the effects of counter-attitudinal advocacy”. Social Influence 5.3 (2010): 164-181.