Cuckoos, cowbirds and hosts: adaptations, trade-offs and constraints

Krüger O (2007)
PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 362(1486): 1873-1886.

Journal Article | Published | English

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Abstract
The interactions between brood parasitic birds and their host species provide one of the best model systems for coevolution. Despite being intensively studied, the parasite-host system provides ample opportunities to test new predictions from both coevolutionary theory as well as life-history theory in general. I identify four main areas that might be especially fruitful: cuckoo female gentes as alternative reproductive strategies, non-random and nonlinear risks of brood parasitism for host individuals, host parental quality and targeted brood parasitism, and differences and similarities between predation risk and parasitism risk. Rather than being a rare and intriguing system to study coevolutionary processes, I believe that avian brood parasites and their hosts are much more important as extreme cases in the evolution of life-history strategies. They provide unique examples of trade-offs and situations where constraints are either completely removed or particularly severe.
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Krüger O. Cuckoos, cowbirds and hosts: adaptations, trade-offs and constraints. PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES. 2007;362(1486):1873-1886.
Krüger, O. (2007). Cuckoos, cowbirds and hosts: adaptations, trade-offs and constraints. PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, 362(1486), 1873-1886.
Krüger, O. (2007). Cuckoos, cowbirds and hosts: adaptations, trade-offs and constraints. PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 362, 1873-1886.
Krüger, O., 2007. Cuckoos, cowbirds and hosts: adaptations, trade-offs and constraints. PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, 362(1486), p 1873-1886.
O. Krüger, “Cuckoos, cowbirds and hosts: adaptations, trade-offs and constraints”, PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, vol. 362, 2007, pp. 1873-1886.
Krüger, O.: Cuckoos, cowbirds and hosts: adaptations, trade-offs and constraints. PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES. 362, 1873-1886 (2007).
Krüger, Oliver. “Cuckoos, cowbirds and hosts: adaptations, trade-offs and constraints”. PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 362.1486 (2007): 1873-1886.
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151 References

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Brown-headed cowbirds skew host offspring sex ratios
Zanette L, MacDougall-Shakleton E, Clinchy M, Smith J.N.M., 2005

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