Using mandatory data collection on multiresistant bacteria for internal surveillance in a hospital

Sagel U, Mikolajczyk RT, Krämer A (2004)
Methods of Information in Medicine 43(5): 483-485.

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Objectives: Multiresistant pathogens cause major clinical problems and considerably increase treatment costs. Since 2001 the Protection Against Infection Act (PIA) obligates hospitals in Germany to the documentation of multiresistant bacteria. We analyzed the use of these data for routine internal surveillance. Methods: We used standard data collected for the mandatory documentation and studied consecutive diagnoses of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a 893-bed tertiary level hospital in North Rhine-Westphalia in Germany. Based on the Poisson distribution for the cumulative yearly incidence of MRSA, we defined a threshold level for an outbreak. Results: During a 12-month time period 80 patients were diagnosed with MRSA. The time structure and spatial distribution of different MRSA phenotypes (defined through specific antibiotic resistance patterns) were consistent with the within-hospital transmission. In the two preceding time periods of 12 months each, 15 respectively 8 patients with MRSA were found. The defined alert threshold level for cumulative yearly incidence was crossed in the beginnings of the outbreak. Conclusion: Monitoring the mandatory data collected on multiresistant bacteria allows the early detection of accumulations suspect for the within-hospital transmission. This knowledge can be used for a fast reaction and breaking off the transmission chains.
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Zeitschriftentitel
Methods of Information in Medicine
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43
Zeitschriftennummer
5
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483-485
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Sagel U, Mikolajczyk RT, Krämer A. Using mandatory data collection on multiresistant bacteria for internal surveillance in a hospital. Methods of Information in Medicine. 2004;43(5):483-485.
Sagel, U., Mikolajczyk, R. T., & Krämer, A. (2004). Using mandatory data collection on multiresistant bacteria for internal surveillance in a hospital. Methods of Information in Medicine, 43(5), 483-485.
Sagel, U., Mikolajczyk, R. T., and Krämer, A. (2004). Using mandatory data collection on multiresistant bacteria for internal surveillance in a hospital. Methods of Information in Medicine 43, 483-485.
Sagel, U., Mikolajczyk, R.T., & Krämer, A., 2004. Using mandatory data collection on multiresistant bacteria for internal surveillance in a hospital. Methods of Information in Medicine, 43(5), p 483-485.
U. Sagel, R.T. Mikolajczyk, and A. Krämer, “Using mandatory data collection on multiresistant bacteria for internal surveillance in a hospital”, Methods of Information in Medicine, vol. 43, 2004, pp. 483-485.
Sagel, U., Mikolajczyk, R.T., Krämer, A.: Using mandatory data collection on multiresistant bacteria for internal surveillance in a hospital. Methods of Information in Medicine. 43, 483-485 (2004).
Sagel, Ulrich, Mikolajczyk, Rafael T., and Krämer, Alexander. “Using mandatory data collection on multiresistant bacteria for internal surveillance in a hospital”. Methods of Information in Medicine 43.5 (2004): 483-485.
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2 Zitationen in Europe PMC

Daten bereitgestellt von Europe PubMed Central.

Evaluating the utility of syndromic surveillance algorithms for screening to detect potentially clonal hospital infection outbreaks.
Carnevale RJ, Talbot TR, Schaffner W, Bloch KC, Daniels TL, Miller RA., J Am Med Inform Assoc 18(4), 2011
PMID: 21606134
Vancomycin-resistant enterococci outbreak, Germany, and calculation of outbreak start.
Sagel U, Schulte B, Heeg P, Borgmann S., Emerg Infect Dis 14(2), 2008
PMID: 18258130

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