What do facial expressions convey: feeling states, behavioral intentions, or action requests?

Horstmann G (2003)
Emotion 3(2): 150-166.

Journal Article | Published | English

No fulltext has been uploaded

Abstract
Emotion theorists assume certain facial displays to convey information about the expresser's emotional state. In contrast, behavioral ecologists assume them to indicate behavioral intentions or action requests. To test these contrasting positions, over 2,000 online participants were presented with facial expressions and asked what they revealed-feeling states, behavioral intentions, or action requests. The majority of the observers chose feeling states as the message of facial expressions of disgust, fear, sadness, happiness, and surprise, supporting the emotions view. Only the anger display tended to elicit more choices of behavioral intention or action request, partially supporting the behavioral ecology view. The results support the view that facial expressions communicate emotions, with emotions being multicomponential phenomena that comprise feelings, intentions, and wishes.
Publishing Year
ISSN
PUB-ID

Cite this

Horstmann G. What do facial expressions convey: feeling states, behavioral intentions, or action requests? Emotion. 2003;3(2):150-166.
Horstmann, G. (2003). What do facial expressions convey: feeling states, behavioral intentions, or action requests? Emotion, 3(2), 150-166.
Horstmann, G. (2003). What do facial expressions convey: feeling states, behavioral intentions, or action requests? Emotion 3, 150-166.
Horstmann, G., 2003. What do facial expressions convey: feeling states, behavioral intentions, or action requests? Emotion, 3(2), p 150-166.
G. Horstmann, “What do facial expressions convey: feeling states, behavioral intentions, or action requests?”, Emotion, vol. 3, 2003, pp. 150-166.
Horstmann, G.: What do facial expressions convey: feeling states, behavioral intentions, or action requests? Emotion. 3, 150-166 (2003).
Horstmann, Gernot. “What do facial expressions convey: feeling states, behavioral intentions, or action requests?”. Emotion 3.2 (2003): 150-166.
This data publication is cited in the following publications:
This publication cites the following data publications:

26 Citations in Europe PMC

Data provided by Europe PubMed Central.

Viewing pain and happy faces elicited similar changes in postural body sway.
Gea J, Munoz MA, Costa I, Ciria LF, Miranda JG, Montoya P., PLoS ONE 9(8), 2014
PMID: 25093727

36 References

Data provided by Europe PubMed Central.

Universals and cultural differences in the judgments of facial expressions of emotion.
Ekman P, Friesen WV, O'Sullivan M, Chan A, Diacoyanni-Tarlatzis I, Heider K, Krause R, LeCompte WA, Pitcairn T, Ricci-Bitti PE., J Pers Soc Psychol 53(4), 1987
PMID: 3681648
Sociality of solitary smiling: Potentiation by an implicit audience.
Fridlund, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 60(2), 1991
The intensity of facial expression is determined by underlying affective state and social situation.
Hess, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 69(2), 1995
Social context effects on facial activity in a negative emotional setting.
Jakobs E, Manstead AS, Fischer AH., Emotion 1(1), 2001
PMID: 12894811
The James-Lange Theory of Emotions: A Critical Examination and an Alternative Theory
Cannon, The American Journal of Psychology 39(1/4), 1927
Cognitive, social, and physiological determinants of emotional state.
SCHACHTER S, SINGER JE., Psychol Rev 69(), 1962
PMID: 14497895
Social and emotional messages of smiling: An ethological approach.
Kraut, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 37(9), 1979
II.—WHAT IS AN EMOTION ?
JAMES, Mind os ix(34), 1884
An experimental analysis of surprise
Meyer, Cognition & Emotion 5(4), 1991
Expression, emotion, neither, or both?
Frijda, Cognition & Emotion 9(6), 1995

Export

0 Marked Publications

Open Data PUB

Web of Science

View record in Web of Science®

Sources

PMID: 12899416
PubMed | Europe PMC

Search this title in

Google Scholar