The glycosylated cell surface protein Rpf2, containing a resuscitation-promoting factor motif, is involved in intercellular communication of Corynebacterium glutamicum

Hartmann M, Barsch A, Niehaus K, Pühler A, Tauch A, Kalinowski J (2004)
ARCHIVES OF MICROBIOLOGY 182(4): 299-312.

Journal Article | Published | English

No fulltext has been uploaded

Author
; ; ; ; ;
Abstract
The genome of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 contains two genes, rpf1 and rpf2, encoding proteins with similarities to the essential resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf) of Micrococcus luteus. Both the Rpf1 (20.4 kDa) and Rpf2 (40.3 kDa) proteins share the so-called Rpf motif, a highly conserved protein domain of approximately 70 amino acids, which is also present in Rpf-like proteins of other gram-positive bacteria with a high G+C content of the chromosomal DNA. Purification of the C. glutamicum Rpf2 protein from concentrated supernatants, SDS-PAGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry identified modified Rpf2 variants with increased or reduced mobility when compared with the calculated size of Rpf2. A Western blot-based enzyme immunoassay demonstrated glycosylation of the Rpf2 variants with higher molecular masses. Galactose and mannose were identified as two components of the oligosaccharide portion of the Rpf2 glycoprotein by capillary gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. The Rpf2 protein was localized on the surface of C. glutamicum with the use of immuno-fluorescence microscopy. C. glutamicum strains with defined deletions in the rpf1 or rpf2 gene or simultaneous deletions in both rpf genes were constructed, indicating that the rpf genes are neither individually nor collectively essential for C. glutamicum. The C. glutamicum rpf double mutant displayed slower growth and a prolonged lag phase after transfer of long-stored cells into fresh medium. The addition of supernatant from exponentially growing cultures of the rpf double mutant, the wild type or C. glutamicum strains with increased expression of the rpf1 or rpf2 gene significantly reduced the lag phase of long-stored wild-type and rpf single mutant strains, but addition of purified His-tagged Rpf1 or Rpf2 did not. In contrast, the lag phase of the C. glutamicum rpf double mutant was not affected upon addition of these culture supernatants.
Publishing Year
ISSN
eISSN
PUB-ID

Cite this

Hartmann M, Barsch A, Niehaus K, Pühler A, Tauch A, Kalinowski J. The glycosylated cell surface protein Rpf2, containing a resuscitation-promoting factor motif, is involved in intercellular communication of Corynebacterium glutamicum. ARCHIVES OF MICROBIOLOGY. 2004;182(4):299-312.
Hartmann, M., Barsch, A., Niehaus, K., Pühler, A., Tauch, A., & Kalinowski, J. (2004). The glycosylated cell surface protein Rpf2, containing a resuscitation-promoting factor motif, is involved in intercellular communication of Corynebacterium glutamicum. ARCHIVES OF MICROBIOLOGY, 182(4), 299-312.
Hartmann, M., Barsch, A., Niehaus, K., Pühler, A., Tauch, A., and Kalinowski, J. (2004). The glycosylated cell surface protein Rpf2, containing a resuscitation-promoting factor motif, is involved in intercellular communication of Corynebacterium glutamicum. ARCHIVES OF MICROBIOLOGY 182, 299-312.
Hartmann, M., et al., 2004. The glycosylated cell surface protein Rpf2, containing a resuscitation-promoting factor motif, is involved in intercellular communication of Corynebacterium glutamicum. ARCHIVES OF MICROBIOLOGY, 182(4), p 299-312.
M. Hartmann, et al., “The glycosylated cell surface protein Rpf2, containing a resuscitation-promoting factor motif, is involved in intercellular communication of Corynebacterium glutamicum”, ARCHIVES OF MICROBIOLOGY, vol. 182, 2004, pp. 299-312.
Hartmann, M., Barsch, A., Niehaus, K., Pühler, A., Tauch, A., Kalinowski, J.: The glycosylated cell surface protein Rpf2, containing a resuscitation-promoting factor motif, is involved in intercellular communication of Corynebacterium glutamicum. ARCHIVES OF MICROBIOLOGY. 182, 299-312 (2004).
Hartmann, M, Barsch, A, Niehaus, K, Pühler, Alfred, Tauch, A, and Kalinowski, Jörn. “The glycosylated cell surface protein Rpf2, containing a resuscitation-promoting factor motif, is involved in intercellular communication of Corynebacterium glutamicum”. ARCHIVES OF MICROBIOLOGY 182.4 (2004): 299-312.
This data publication is cited in the following publications:
This publication cites the following data publications:

29 Citations in Europe PMC

Data provided by Europe PubMed Central.

Non-Invasive Microbial Metabolic Activity Sensing at Single Cell Level by Perfusion of Calcein Acetoxymethyl Ester.
Kramer CE, Singh A, Helfrich S, Grunberger A, Wiechert W, Noh K, Kohlheyer D., PLoS ONE 10(10), 2015
PMID: 26513257
Deletion of manC in Corynebacterium glutamicum results in a phospho-myo-inositol mannoside- and lipoglycan-deficient mutant.
Mishra AK, Krumbach K, Rittmann D, Batt SM, Lee OY, De S, Frunzke J, Besra GS, Eggeling L., Microbiology (Reading, Engl.) 158(Pt 7), 2012
PMID: 22539165

42 References

Data provided by Europe PubMed Central.

Stimulation of the multiplication of Micrococcus luteus by an autocrine growth factor.
Mukamolova GV, Kormer SS, Kell DB, Kaprelyants AS., Arch. Microbiol. 172(1), 1999
PMID: 10398746
The rpf gene of Micrococcus luteus encodes an essential secreted growth factor.
Mukamolova GV, Turapov OA, Kazarian K, Telkov M, Kaprelyants AS, Kell DB, Young M., Mol. Microbiol. 46(3), 2002
PMID: 12410820

GV, Mol Microbiol 46(), 2002
Probability-based protein identification by searching sequence databases using mass spectrometry data.
Perkins DN, Pappin DJ, Creasy DM, Cottrell JS., Electrophoresis 20(18), 1999
PMID: 10612281
Structure of the cell envelope of corynebacteria: importance of the non-covalently bound lipids in the formation of the cell wall permeability barrier and fracture plane.
Puech V, Chami M, Lemassu A, Laneelle MA, Schiffler B, Gounon P, Bayan N, Benz R, Daffe M., Microbiology (Reading, Engl.) 147(Pt 5), 2001
PMID: 11320139

J, 1989
Glycobiology of surface layer proteins.
Schaffer C, Messner P., Biochimie 83(7), 2001
PMID: 11522387
Prokaryotic glycosylation.
Schaffer C, Graninger M, Messner P., Proteomics 1(2), 2001
PMID: 11680871
Pheromones among the procaryotes.
Stephens K., Crit. Rev. Microbiol. 13(4), 1986
PMID: 3095030

SV, 1981
Gram-negative bacterial communication by N-acyl homoserine lactones: a universal language?
Swift S, Bainton NJ, Winson MK., Trends Microbiol. 2(6), 1994
PMID: 8087450
Corynebacterium glutamicum DNA is subjected to methylation-restriction in Escherichia coli.
Tauch A, Kirchner O, Wehmeier L, Kalinowski J, Puhler A., FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 123(3), 1994
PMID: 7988915
Strategy to sequence the genome of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032: use of a cosmid and a bacterial artificial chromosome library.
Tauch A, Homann I, Mormann S, Ruberg S, Billault A, Bathe B, Brand S, Brockmann-Gretza O, Ruckert C, Schischka N, Wrenger C, Hoheisel J, Mockel B, Huthmacher K, Pfefferle W, Puhler A, Kalinowski J., J. Biotechnol. 95(1), 2002
PMID: 11879709
Efficient electrotransformation of corynebacterium diphtheriae with a mini-replicon derived from the Corynebacterium glutamicum plasmid pGA1.
Tauch A, Kirchner O, Loffler B, Gotker S, Puhler A, Kalinowski J., Curr. Microbiol. 45(5), 2002
PMID: 12232668

Export

0 Marked Publications

Open Data PUB

Web of Science

View record in Web of Science®

Sources

PMID: 15480574
PubMed | Europe PMC

Search this title in

Google Scholar