Motion adaptation leads to parsimonious encoding of natural optic flow by blowfly motion vision system

Heitwerth J, Kern R, van Hateren JH, Egelhaaf M (2005)
J Neurophysiol. 94(3): 1761-1769.

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Neurons sensitive to visual motion change their response properties during prolonged motion stimulation. These changes have been interpreted as adaptive and were concluded, for instance, to adjust the sensitivity of the visual motion pathway to velocity changes or to increase the reliability of encoding of motion information. These conclusions are based on experiments with experimenter-designed motion stimuli that differ substantially with respect to their dynamical properties from the optic flow an animal experiences during normal behavior. We analyze for the first time motion adaptation under natural stimulus conditions. The experiments are done on the H1-cell, an identified neuron in the blowfly visual motion pathway that has served in many previous studies as a model system for visual motion computation. We reconstructed optic flow perceived by a blowfly in free flight and used this behaviorally generated optic flow to study motion adaptation. A variety of measures (variability in spike count, response latency, jitter of spike timing) suggests that the coding quality does not improve with prolonged stimulation. However, although the number of spikes decreases considerably during stimulation with natural optic flow, the amount of information that is conveyed stays nearly constant. Thus the information per spike increases, and motion adaptation leads to parsimonious coding without sacrificing the reliability with which behaviorally relevant information is encoded.
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Heitwerth J, Kern R, van Hateren JH, Egelhaaf M. Motion adaptation leads to parsimonious encoding of natural optic flow by blowfly motion vision system. J Neurophysiol. 2005;94(3):1761-1769.
Heitwerth, J., Kern, R., van Hateren, J. H., & Egelhaaf, M. (2005). Motion adaptation leads to parsimonious encoding of natural optic flow by blowfly motion vision system. J Neurophysiol., 94(3), 1761-1769.
Heitwerth, J., Kern, R., van Hateren, J. H., and Egelhaaf, M. (2005). Motion adaptation leads to parsimonious encoding of natural optic flow by blowfly motion vision system. J Neurophysiol. 94, 1761-1769.
Heitwerth, J., et al., 2005. Motion adaptation leads to parsimonious encoding of natural optic flow by blowfly motion vision system. J Neurophysiol., 94(3), p 1761-1769.
J. Heitwerth, et al., “Motion adaptation leads to parsimonious encoding of natural optic flow by blowfly motion vision system”, J Neurophysiol., vol. 94, 2005, pp. 1761-1769.
Heitwerth, J., Kern, R., van Hateren, J.H., Egelhaaf, M.: Motion adaptation leads to parsimonious encoding of natural optic flow by blowfly motion vision system. J Neurophysiol. 94, 1761-1769 (2005).
Heitwerth, J, Kern, Roland, van Hateren, JH, and Egelhaaf, Martin. “Motion adaptation leads to parsimonious encoding of natural optic flow by blowfly motion vision system”. J Neurophysiol. 94.3 (2005): 1761-1769.
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